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TorGuard to block us torrent traffic

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Brainbleach
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Well so much for TorGuard. Might need a name change while you are at it if you are around much longer which doesn’t look good. Score one for the MPAA.

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Yes I just saw the same article and jumped on the forums to get any clear advice on what current subscribers are entitled to or if any action is being taken on Torguard's part to inform users on any indication of terms or service agreements that may change.

 

But to be fair:

1) Torrenting isn't illegal - Does that mean I can torrent in jurisdictions where it's sane to use a computer "for what it's worth" (thanks to it's software initiatives in the pursuit of science) rather than "for the money" (what it's "sold for" as "intended use" by corporations and the government)?

2) Is TorGuard going to inform users of the complaints brought before them as a company to help respect each other as their consumers? It's not their job to educate us on the laws and the government doesn't educate us on "what's legal". Torrenting can't "kill somebody".

3) The "other guys" never got served I mean take your pick between Surf"brew", Nord"brew", etc. What gives? Those people even used to tell you as consumers don't download American movies through Torrenting portals in the US because Tom Cruise, Hanks, and everybody else may lose a billion dollars and Bruce Willis just had to sell his private island. BUT NETHERLANDS IS OK! 

 

I hate switching and don't want to switch I'm going to wait for some official disclosure from TorGuard on how we all just got screwed and hopefully they use a rubber.

 

If TorGuard can screw me that'd be great trust me I love you guys but please just tell me which software is legal in which country so I can bind and arm all my killswitches to each program within each municipality before I kill myself.

 

But if you give me my money back let me know wherever you're going so I can get you your money wherever you're going to run from "the law" Surf"brew" had to run to the British Virgin Isles. And I dunno about all the others but I'm sure there are still homeless, disabled, and orphans in places like Papua New Guinea or even Costa Rica who would love your money.

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1) What about bittorrent on non-US servers?

2) What about non-bittorrent p2p? Steam, DC++, etc.

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1) BitTorrent on non US servers is a good question and as always has been the case for most people who act outside the privilege by law to make or stream digital content or copies from outside their jurisdiction.

 

For instance streaming content from international programming which is region locked may fall under the "same umbrella" as utilizing BitTorrent by protocol or name for instance "Popcorn Time" as well as "Resilio Sync" both use similar technology. As for "Steam" I'm not sure if it uses the same technology as BitTorrent. Could you imagine "region locked" digital copies of complete operating systems just like PAL and NTSC-J video games!

 

However this may be "tracker specific" since only certain "known trackers" host the infringing content's peers. 

 

That would mean only non US servers would have the right to freely browse these particular sites without coming under any scrutiny and TorGuard should at least provide some form of a disclosure whether through a 'captive portal' (similar to browsing YouTube and Google from the Netherlands) permitting users to provide their consent for access 'at their own risk' or TorGuard publicly discloses the changes to their terms of service and provides their consumers with an aforementioned addendum to their policy where people who utilize BitTorrent specifically (through the announcement of peers to a tracker) to download content or stream content will be unable to on their network via 'packet filtering' to circumvent any form of data transmission utilizing BitTorrent.

 

2) Non-Bittorrent P2P would not fall under the "the same umbrella" I'm presuming this block falls under two tiers we call a and b:

 

a) BitTorrent as a software was used to break the law and to use it on Torguard's servers means you could use it for something illegal which could target TorGuard so they have to stop you from using it.

 

b) Other P2P usage wasn't considered as part of what I read since this article only mentions BitTorrent specifically.

 

If I can't use BitTorrent to download Ubuntu 22.04 this July I'm going to say 'screw this' and find some other provider.

 

Edit:

 

I think the last time I used 'Windoze' Microsoft provided a torrent client to download the ISO

Edited by BukkakeBlaster
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If using non-US servers is not a solution, then I will just have to find a vpn that is located outside of the US. Considering Torguard is located in the US, maybe this was always going to happen, Now maybe the MPAA will go after all the vpn providers located inside the US.

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4 minutes ago, Savage Muppet said:

If using non-US servers is not a solution, then I will just have to find a vpn that is located outside of the US. Considering Torguard is located in the US, maybe this was always going to happen, Now maybe the MPAA will go after all the vpn providers located inside the US.

Non-US VPN providers may be riskier than using a US one. Does Facebook sell your data? Did they break the law AND get paid for it? Could VPN companies in "cheap countries"? 

 

If the MPAA was going after these people it would be an email they can't do anything without the government helping them.

 

If the government wants to make torrenting impossible through a VPN provider due to encryption standards and over the internet tunnels which protect users from a third party intercepting that transmission than how can I be certain that an overseas VPN provider can act in the interest of my rights and not some foreign allegiance?

 

I torrent a lot of my personal data to each of my clients (my server, laptop, workstation, and cell phone) and if I'm on 5G or away from my computer and not using encryption provided by a VPN I couldn't think of any workaround other than using some cloud based hosting service which would encrypt my data locally prior to transmission on the cloud and sync through some local client.

 

I could no longer self host my own data and provide a manageable and reliable means to transfer and verify my files are consistent among platforms.

 

Why does the government prefer going after TorGuard as opposed to any other VPN provider who would 'allow torrenting'?

 

In the end it makes sense to find a provider outside the way the government wants to target TorGuard for no reason but how do we know these people outside the US can't act against us? For instance Surf"brew" is in Netherlands, Nord"brew" is in Panama sounds like you're doing "immigration" or some "drug deal" and either way we are still getting screwed.

 

I wonder if TorGuard will give us our money back. It's in their name "Tor"-Guard and I thought that was the idea they can encrypt torrents.

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Wow, what the heck. So do I get my lifetime membership fee back? Paid $250 in November for it. Now I know why- it went to the legal slush fund. So are logs now being kept!? This news should have come from Torguard. 

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23 minutes ago, d-j-a said:

Wow, what the heck. So do I get my lifetime membership fee back? Paid $250 in November for it. Now I know why- it went to the legal slush fund. So are logs now being kept!? This news should have come from Torguard. 

I wouldn't be worried d-j-a first off TorGuard did not go against any of their claims when you signed up with them such as 'no logging' etc.

 

Also, this is a request from the MPAA for the US Government to take action on their behalf and since TorGuard is only making users unable to torrent within this scope of their complaint it's probably a bit of an overreaction to presume that torrenting or similar technology will be blocked on every server they offer.

 

They mention specifically 'QuadraNet' which I know from their 10 Gbit hosting list is only one provider who provides TorGuard clients with their service.

 

I agree it may sound frustrating but in all honesty it would be belligerent to intentionally utilize their VPN service to break the law. I think they may have mistakenly advised some consumers that torrenting digital content which was illegal from within that country or region was grounds for TorGuard breaking the law. This is a similar incident with MegaUpload was targeted for hosting pirated content from which they claimed they had no transparency over.

 

If these cases existed worldwide and similar technologies created these problems for anyone and everyone I think it's safe to presume TorGuard will respect us as their customers internationally and allow us to utilize their servers worldwide and to allow for the transmission of encrypted data and only honor governments at their request to defend their laws within the scope of what is possible, feasible, and economical. Since utilizing a firewall to reject any BitTorrent connections will prevent any illegal activity just as urinal cakes with guards will prevent men from flushing tampons or other hygiene products we can all still feel safe.

 

No need to trust any rogue entities or foreign allegiance with our VPN tunnels without Torguard's consensus and professional oversight.

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2 minutes ago, Bit of Honey said:

What"s the big deal. I'm in the South East USA, on ATT Fiber, over WIFi v5 with other computers streaming and I still get more than enough bandwidh.

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The big deal was TorGuard has to act on behalf of the court because of a motion set by the MPAA to help stop piracy.

 

On US servers torrenting copyrighted works is illegal and TorGuard has to implement measures to prevent that through blocking BitTorrent specifically though they have no transparency on how or what activity is conducted by their users.

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My bad I really didn't make my main point clear. I am in the south east USA and connected to the Montreal server. That's bypassing the ban on tor connections in the USA. I still had more than enough bandwidth to access the files that I need to.  I don't see the ban on the USA servers as a problem for me.

Edited by Bit of Honey
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4 minutes ago, Bit of Honey said:

My bad I really didn't make my main point clear. I am in the south east USA and connected to the Montreal server. That's bypassing the ban on tor connections in the USA. I still had more than enough bandwidth to access the files that I need to.  I don't see the ban on the USA servers as a problem for me.

The block is for BitTorrent connections specifically via firewall rules (more than likely packet filtering) they don't make any mention of Tor.

 

It may not immediately come off as a problem however it's strange they would go after TorGuard and not the infringing parties responsible for hosting such content as has been the case in the past.

 

It's like banning gasoline engines since SUV's consume more gasoline.

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12 minutes ago, BukkakeBlaster said:

BitTorrent

I consider BitTorrent as a software product that uses Tor Connections....  "The Tor network is a system that facilitates anonymous communication by concealing a user's Internet Protocol (IP) address through encryption and a series of self-described anonymous and private connections."

It's my understanding any P2P connection, or ANY connection that makes your connection to a Torrent host anonymous, will be blocked. It's not the content that they are blocking, because they can't see it anyway.  It's anyone that is leveraging the VPN to connect to P2P and Torrent hosting sites, such as Pirate Bay, by completely obfuscating their IP address in the United States.  

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6 minutes ago, Bit of Honey said:

I consider BitTorrent as a software product that uses Tor Connections....  "The Tor network is a system that facilitates anonymous communication by concealing a user's Internet Protocol (IP) address through encryption and a series of self-described anonymous and private connections."

It's my understanding any P2P connection, or ANY connection that makes your connection to a Torrent host anonymous, will be blocked. It's not the content that they are blocking, because they can't see it anyway.  It's anyone that is leveraging the VPN to connect to P2P and Torrent hosting sites, such as Pirate Bay, by completely obfuscating their IP address in the United States.  

 

So BitTorrent is not Tor and they are both used for entirely different purposes.

 

The problem isn't anonymity and I don't know where your information is from.

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21 minutes ago, BukkakeBlaster said:

 

So BitTorrent is not Tor and they are both used for entirely different purposes.

 

The problem isn't anonymity and I don't know where your information is from.


@BukkakeBlaster Is Correct Tor "Onion Network" and Bittorrent Are Not The Exact same Thing. I Believe They Operate Differently.

One Thing to Also Keep in mind is that The Blocking on USA Servers May Not Be In Effect Right Now - It Might Be something that is Coming Within the next Couple Weeks, In Torguard's Recent Blog Post it States That This Month They Have Started* To Take Measures To Block > But it Doesn't Specifically State that Those Measures are Fully in Place Yet.
 

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Correct I over generalized in my statement about Bittorrent versus Tor protocols.

However the concept is the same, and the point of my post is that Torguard will crack down on USA servers that anonymize connections that access known tor or torrent servers.

In my original post I made note that I bypassed the USA servers of Torguard and went to Canada and had sufficient bandwidth for my purposes, that is all.

My apologies if I did not make that clear.

 

 

BitTorrent is a communication protocol for peer-to-peer file sharing (P2P), which enables users to distribute data and electronic files over the Internet in a decentralized manner.

Tor, short for The Onion Router, is free and open-source software for enabling anonymous communication.[7] It directs Internet traffic through a free, worldwide, volunteer overlay network, consisting of more than six thousand relays,[8] for concealing a user's location and usage from anyone conducting network surveillance or traffic analysis[9]. Using Tor makes it more difficult to trace the Internet activity to the user. Tor's intended use is to protect the personal privacy of its users, as well as their freedom and ability to conduct confidential communication by keeping their Internet activities unmonitored.

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All technical terms aside here is a simple analogy to help guide your understanding:

 

1) Tor is a bird 

2) BitTorrent is a dog

 

TorGuard is putting up the electric fence on their server so that their dog doesn't go and possibly engage in illegal activity.

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3 minutes ago, BukkakeBlaster said:

All technical terms aside here is a simple analogy to help guide your understanding:

 

1) Tor is a bird 

2) BitTorrent is a dog

 

TorGuard is putting up the electric fence on their server so that their dog doesn't go and possibly engage in illegal activity.

Not sure I understand your analogy.  Sill no worries.  I will let others add to this topic/thread if they see fit. That is all. 😃

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Just now, Bit of Honey said:

Not sure I understand your analogy.  Sill no worries.  I will let others add to this topic/thread if they see fit. That is all. 😃

 

Ignore this guy.

 

BitTorrent will be blocked in the US.

 

Tor is not the software used by the infringing parties who weren't responsible for the illegal activity conducted through the exchange of copyrighted content known as "piracy".

 

The analogy is now:

 

1) BitTorrent is a fish - TorGuard put this fish in a tank to stop it from swimming in illegal water.

 

2) Tor is oxygen

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An analogy isn't needed. The 'Tor Network' is just that: a network. You can only connect to that network via a specialized browser known as the 'Tor Browser.' A VPN used in this case causes your encrypted connection to the 'Tor Network' to seem that it has originated somewhere else. Without a VPN, the only thing that could be derived is that you have made a connection to the 'Tor Network.' The connection is still encrypted via the 'Tor Browser.'

BitTorrent is a protocol. Meaning it is a method of sharing data. It works by taking a file, chopping it up into little pieces, and then these pieces are shared between multiple users. Once you have acquired all the pieces they get put back together to form the original file a user intended to download. It is a fantastic method of transferring data between multiple users as you are not dependent on a single server's upload speed. (eg. Downloading a file from a server with 100Mbps upload speed is going to go much slower than if you were downloading from 10 servers that can only upload at 10Mbps. Crude example but hopefully that makes sense). I think 'World of Warcraft' was one of the first games to use BitTorrent for game updates & patches since they were all being distributed between user's computers and lessened the load on the actual game servers. Windows even has an option in the update settings to enable the sharing of updates across the network with other Windows machines allowing for quicker distribution of updates that do not tax Microsoft servers and allows for quicker downloading overall. 

I'm very interested to see how and what TorGuard will announce this to customers. I, too, am curious to see if this will change anything for connections to servers outside the US as I have paid for a multi-year subscription along with access to their 10GB server nodes. As far as I'm aware, there is only ONE offshore node in their 10GB list and it's in the UK. 

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You don't need Tor Browser to connect to the Tor network.

7 minutes ago, alicane said:

An analogy isn't needed. The 'Tor Network' is just that: a network. You can only connect to that network via a specialized browser known as the 'Tor Browser.' A VPN used in this case causes your encrypted connection to the 'Tor Network' to seem that it has originated somewhere else. Without a VPN, the only thing that could be derived is that you have made a connection to the 'Tor Network.' The connection is still encrypted via the 'Tor Browser.'

BitTorrent is a protocol. Meaning it is a method of sharing data. It works by taking a file, chopping it up into little pieces, and then these pieces are shared between multiple users. Once you have acquired all the pieces they get put back together to form the original file a user intended to download. It is a fantastic method of transferring data between multiple users as you are not dependent on a single server's upload speed. (eg. Downloading a file from a server with 100Mbps upload speed is going to go much slower than if you were downloading from 10 servers that can only upload at 10Mbps. Crude example but hopefully that makes sense). I think 'World of Warcraft' was one of the first games to use BitTorrent for game updates & patches since they were all being distributed between user's computers and lessened the load on the actual game servers. Windows even has an option in the update settings to enable the sharing of updates across the network with other Windows machines allowing for quicker distribution of updates that do not tax Microsoft servers and allows for quicker downloading overall. 

I'm very interested to see how and what TorGuard will announce this to customers. I, too, am curious to see if this will change anything for connections to servers outside the US as I have paid for a multi-year subscription along with access to their 10GB server nodes. As far as I'm aware, there is only ONE offshore node in their 10GB list and it's in the UK. 

 

You don't need to use a Tor Browser to connect to the Tor network. Applications can utilize torsocks or any other front end for Tor even though the available socks 5 proxy to route traffic through the Tor network.

 

TorGuard already made their announcement about blocking BitTorrent on their US servers however the lack of transparency in communicating clients through decentralized methods will make this inevitably impossible. For instance trackers will host a list of peers who can share a peer list amongst themselves through modern torrent clients and encrypted traffic will not be circumvented by any firewall.

 

BitTorrent is a wonderful way to transfer files with an already provided checksum however the data can be heavily fragmented (due to the block architecture) for the end user making storage and compression difficult.

 

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  • Support changed the title to TorGuard to block us torrent traffic

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